Top

Here's A Secret Ingredient That's Turning Food Blue In Mumbai

Heres A Secret Ingredient Thats Turning Food Blue In Mumbai
X

The first time I saw blue food, it was on my Instagram feed while I was casually browsing for new global food trends. And obviously, I was anticipating this trend to hit the Indian food scene too. But, the most important question I asked myself was, how does the food turn blue? Is it artificial flavouring or something I'm clearly unaware about. It was definitely the latter.

So, here I'm about to unveil the secret ingredient that has taken the global food space by storm. The magic potion is called Butterfly Pea Flower, that is turned into a powder by drying it out.

That's the reason chefs from restaurants like Foo, are dyeing Japanese rice blue, making it deliciously buttery and garlicky!

Woodside Inn, Colaba: Think fine dining and Butterfly Pea Flower Linguini tossed in a Lobster bisque, topped with a Lobster shell and a parmesan crisp truly defines it.

Blue Chicken Dimsums at Tygr is a hit with the crowd who's fond of new experiences and instagramming their eats.

Foodhall and Tea Trunk have barked upon this trend's popularity, retailing butterfly pea flower teas, bordering on a novel experience for tea drinkers.

Nara Thai is dip-dyeing sago balls, making Sakoo Piek, a delicious Thai dessert. No Thai dessert feels complete without Pandan leaves that takes the flavour of sago to another level altogether. If you're a food theatrics fan and purple is your favourite colour, order Khao Phad, their blue steam rice with Thai herbs and wait till you drizzle some lemon juice on it. Yes! It turns purple.

So, basically, this year all about changing up the game, bleeding food blue; blue is here to stay. It's just another reason for chefs to be funky and experimental with food along with being able to entice their Instagram fans.

Shreya Jalavadia

Shreya Jalavadia

    Next Story